Search Committee Announces New Minister for Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church – Rev. Dr. Cheri DiNovo

Search Committee Announces New Minister for Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church – Rev. Dr. Cheri DiNovo

From the Search Committee

A formal meeting of our community of faith was held on Sunday Sept. 17, 2017. After the presentation of their report by members of the Search Committee, members agreed by vote to the following: to extend a call to Rev. Dr. Cheri Di Novo effective Jan. 1, 2018 as per the terms that were outlined in the report; to request that Toronto Conference approve this call; and that the Search Committee be disbanded  following the covenanting service with our sincere thanks. There will be an opportunity to meet Cheri during and after the service on Oct 1, 2017. Please pray for Cheri and for all of us as a community of faith as we open our hearts and minds to each other’s ministry in this new pastoral relationship.

Opportunities in the next few months to see and hear our new minister, Rev. Dr. Cheri Di Novo

  1. Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram for: excerpts from an Anglican conference in Jamaica in early October on LGBTQ issues; streamed TED talk given at The Brickworks on Oct 27; CBC Ideas on “Gender Wars” airing in Nov.; TVO Political Blind Date airing in Nov.
  2. Tune in to her Youtube channel.
  3. Read her book, Querying Evangelism: Growing A Community From the Outside In, Pilgrim Press.
On the Ground in Palestine, Sept. 17, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Sept. 17, 2017

This information comes from Sabeel, Jerusalem, from their weekly prayer service.

At the beginning of this school year, over two thousand classrooms are lacking for Palestinian students in Israeli-occupied east Jerusalem. The Jerusalem municipality and state authorities have failed to provide the lacking classrooms as ordered by an Israeli High Court ruling five years ago. The Jerusalem municipality allocates most of its funds to its Jewish residents and deprives the Palestinian community of its basic needs.

On Wednesday, Sept. 6, the Supreme Court held a hearing regarding the secret procedures governing the work of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission, despite the opposition of the Israeli state. The Supreme Court decision came following an appeal representing 108 petitioners. The petitioners demanded the establishment of legislation to regulate operations of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission, its roles, authority, form of organization and management, and to require monitoring of its activities and facilities.

On Monday, Sept. 4, Palestinian security forces detained Issa Amro, a prominent human rights activist. Issa’s arrest came a day after he posted comments on his Facebook criticizing Palestinian forces for arresting a journalist. Issa was released from prison on Sunday, Sept. 10.

“The demolition of educational facilities before the start of the school year epitomizes the administrative cruelty and systematic harassment by the authorities designed to drive Palestinians from their land.”

Activists and residents of the village of Jubbet al-Dhib in the southern occupied West Bank district of Bethlehem rebuilt their school in one night. The school was destroyed by Israeli forces two weeks ago.
Israeli police evicted a Palestinian family from their East Jerusalem home. The Shamasnehs vacated the house, where they had lived for 53 years, after Israeli courts ruled in favor of the alleged heir of its original Jewish owners pre 1948. The case was brought by the Israel Land Fund, a right-wing non-governmental organization that advocates, for ideological reasons, the takeover of Palestinian land.

According to Haaretz, Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman told journalists in late August that plans for the implementation of a measure virtually unheard of since 1967 were months away from completion. These are plans for the eviction: Eviction and demolition of two whole West Bank Palestinian villages. Together, the two villages, Susiya, in the South Hebron Hills, and Khan al-Ahmar, east of Jerusalem, are home to hundreds of people, about half of them minors.  Demolishing these communities would constitute the forcible transfer of protected persons, a war crime under the Fourth Geneva Convention.

The following is one of a number of items in the B’Tselem newsletter. 

On Aug. 22, Israeli authorities demolished the school at the community of Jub a-Dib, southeast of Bethlehem, leaving 80 pupils without an educational facility. In Abu a-Nuwar, on Aug. 9, the Civil Administration confiscated solar panels donated by the international community, that provided electricity to the school and kindergarten. On Aug. 21, Civil Administration personnel accompanied by around fifty soldiers, police and border police officers arrived at the Badu al-Baba community which is located near al-‘Eizariyah, northeast of Jerusalem. They dismantled and confiscated a pre-fab that had been placed there around three weeks prior, to serve as a kindergarten for 25 local children aged 4-6, who do not have an alternative educational facility.

The demolition of educational facilities before the start of the school year epitomizes the administrative cruelty and systematic harassment by the authorities designed to drive Palestinians from their land.
Posted in Faith
Spirituality Retreat- Friday October 27 Evening and Saturday October 28, 2017

Spirituality Retreat- Friday October 27 Evening and Saturday October 28, 2017

Letters from the Heart: An Overnight Retreat based on the Letters of Henri Nouwen

 

A Time Apart to Deepen Our Spiritual Live

“Nurture your contemplative side, be in constant conversation with God, who loves you most intimately, and let yourself be swept off your feet in that great encounter…. “ (letter to Jim)

Henri Nouwen (1932-1996) is described by Richard Rohr, OFM, as one of the great spiritual writers of the 20th century.  Through his thirty-nine books, including The Return of the Prodigal Son and The Wounded Healer, he gave us a vocabulary for contemporary spirituality and formation.  In addition to a prolific writing and teaching career, Nouwen, a Dutch Catholic priest, received over 16 000 letters in his life-time and answered each letter with a pastor’s heart.  We will draw on some of his pastoral letters – letters about such aspects of the spiritual life as suffering, the nature of God, spiritual disciplines, life transitions, gratitude, trust – and reflect on how these letters speak to our lives today.  Participants will share in small groups with regular intervals, if desired, for solitude, reflection, writing and labyrinth walking.

 

The retreat will be led by TSP members Barbara Lloyd, an experienced retreat leader, and Gabrielle Earnshaw, Nouwen’s archivist and editor of Love, Henri: Letters on the Spiritual Life  (Random House, 2016).

 

Begins with registration on Friday October 27 at 6:00 p.m. and the program begins at 7:00; Ends 4 p.m. Saturday October 28.  Participants must commit to attend the full program but a commuter option is available for those who cannot stay overnight at the Convent.

 

Fee $100 (includes accommodation for one night, breakfast and lunch); $50.00 commuter fee (includes lunch)

 

Assistance is available for those for whom the cost is prohibitive.  Please speak to Betsy Anderson for more information.

 

Where

 

The retreat will take place at St. John’s Convent Guest House of the Sisterhood of St. John of the Divine, an Anglican religious community and peaceful oasis in North York (Finch/Yonge St.).  Rooms are single and shared bathrooms are down the hall.  The SSJD community gathers for prayer four times a day and we are invited to join if we choose.  In keeping with the rhythms of the convent, meals will be taken in silence. Participants may choose to stay for the evening meal and Compline on the Saturday.  If so, an additional charge of $10 can be paid at the time of registration.

 

St. John’s Convent Guest House (The Sisterhood of St. John of the Divine)

233 Cummer Avenue

Toronto, ON M2M 2E8

 

How to Register

 

  1. Print and Complete the Registration Form at https://goo.gl/kyNoxL
  2. Submit completed Registration Form and Cheque to Betsy Anderson, Ann Rowland, Barbara Lloyd or Gabrielle Earnshaw

 

There are 20 spots available for this retreat.  Registration is on a first come basis.  The retreat is open to all members and adherents of TSP.  A completed Registration Form and cheque will secure your spot.  In the event the retreat is under-subscribed we will open the retreat to the wider community.  In the event the retreat is over-subscribed we will consider offering the retreat again in the Spring.

 

Cheques are to be made out to: Trinity St. Paul’s United Church

 

Registration Deadline: October 1, 2017

 

Planners: Betsy Anderson, Barbara Lloyd, Gabrielle Earnshaw and Ann Rowland. Please contact Gabrielle Earnshaw, gearns8961@rogers.com for more information.

10th Anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada needs a legislative framework to fulfill the promise of this vital human rights instrument – UBCIC

10th Anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada needs a legislative framework to fulfill the promise of this vital human rights instrument – UBCIC

Posted by Ubcic on September 13, 2017

 

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provides a crucial framework to achieve reconciliation. Such a human rights-­‐based approach is essential to address the racism and discrimination that has caused such profound harm to Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world.  Violations include uprooting Indigenous peoples from their territories and resources, failure to honour Treaties, tearing Indigenous children from their families, and making Indigenous women, girls and two-­‐ spirited people the targets of unimaginable violence.

 

The adoption of the UN Declaration ten years ago today – on September 13, 2007 – was a crucial victory in the evolution of international human rights law. This historic achievement was possible because Indigenous peoples persisted for more than two decades in advancing a strong and powerful vision of self-­‐determination, decolonization and non-­‐discrimination.

 

The adoption of the Declaration was also made possible because, by the end of this process, influential states including Canada had finally come to accept the necessity and urgency of a new relationship with Indigenous peoples.

 

The UN General Assembly has unanimously reaffirmed the Declaration on three separate occasions, calling for full implementation at national and international levels.

 

Fulfilling this commitment requires meaningful and lasting changes to eliminate discriminatory laws, policies and practices and to ensure Indigenous peoples make their own decisions about their lives and futures.

 

Yet, a decade after the adoption of the Declaration, Canada still lacks concrete and effective mechanisms to uphold its provisions. This is despite many positive statements from the current government committing to fully implement the Declaration.

 

Last month, the United Nations’ top anti-­‐racism body, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, strongly supported Indigenous peoples in urging Canada to adopt a legislative framework and national action plan to implement the UN Declaration.

 

A private members bill expected to come before the House of Commons this fall for second reading – Bill C-­‐262 introduced by MP Romeo Saganash – contains elements of such a framework. This includes: repudiation of colonialism and doctrines of superiority; affirmation that the standards set out in the UN Declaration have application in Canadian law; and review and reform of federal legislation to ensure consistency with the minimum standards set out in the UN Declaration. In addition, the Bill requires that a national action plan be developed in partnership with Indigenous peoples.

 

By approaching implementation of the Declaration through a legislative framework, there is greater assurance that crucial progress made will not be undone by a future government. Our organizations and Nations call on the federal government to embrace and build on the key elements of implementation already set out in Bill C-­‐262.

 

We appreciate that full implementation of the Declaration requires long-­‐term commitment and collaboration. As the Truth and Reconciliation Commission repeatedly reminded us, “reconciliation is going to take hard work.”

 

This is the time to act. Public responses to the TRC’s Calls to Action demonstrate a profound desire among Canadians to build a just relationship between Indigenous peoples and non-­‐Indigenous Canadians. As the TRC itself stated, the Declaration provides the framework for doing so. However, putting this framework into place requires more than fine words. It requires concrete, effective action.

 

The Coalition for the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples

 

Statement endorsed by:

 

Amnesty International Canada; Amnistie internationale Canada francophone; Assembly of First Nations; Assemblée des Premières Nations Québec-­‐Labrador and Assembly of First Nations Quebec-­‐Labrador; British Columbia Assembly of First Nations; Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers); Confederacy of Treaty 6; First Nations Summit; Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee); Indigenous Bar Association; Indigenous World Association; KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives; Métis Nation; MiningWatch Canada; Native Women’s Association of Canada; Nunavut Tunngavik; Oxfam Canada; Oxfam-­‐Québec; Quebec Native Women/Femmes Autochtones du Québec; Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs

 

Source: 10th Anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada needs a legislative framework to fulfill the promise of this vital human rights instrument – UBCIC

On the Ground in Palestine – Sept. 1, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine – Sept. 1, 2017

Haaretz reports, “The start of the school year in a West Bank village was pushed back to Sunday (Aug. 27) after the Israeli Civil Administration on Tuesday confiscated and destroyed trailers that were supposed to serve as classrooms, along with other educational equipment. Authorities have confiscated and destroyed trailers used as classrooms in three other Palestinian communities in the last two weeks.”

According to the Jerusalem Post, “The Palestinian leadership in Ramallah is considering dismantling the Palestinian Authority (PA), if there is no political horizon to establish an independent Palestinian state, [said] Ahmad Majdalani, a confidant of PA President Mahmoud Abbas.

Last month, Israel revoked the citizenship of hundreds of Israeli Arab Bedouins and left them stateless. Over  500 citizens lost their citizen-status with a single keystroke and with no further explanation.        

Last week, Israeli authorities stormed the Silwan neighborhood of occupied East Jerusalem and demolished a Palestinian home for the second time. The same home, 60 square metres, had just been demolished on Aug. 15 by the Israeli army.

With the help of fellow Jerusalemites, the family rebuilt a temporary home made of tin sheets, which Israeli forces came to destroy on Aug. 22. The family and their friends are already working to rebuild the house for the third time.

A brand-new Palestinian primary school in Jubbet Al-Dhib was razed by Israel just as the new school year was set to begin. The six newly installed steel terrapin cabins were erected in the village of Jubbet Al Dhib so that local children do not have to walk for an hour to get to school. A total of 55 West Bank schools are currently threatened with demolition and “stop-work” orders.

From the Middle East Working Group