Third Sunday of Easter – Paul’s Hymn Blog

Third Sunday of Easter – Paul’s Hymn Blog

Sunday, April 15 2018

Third Sunday of Easter

1 John 3:1-7, Psalm 4, Luke 24:36b-48

by Paul Stott

 

VU 186 – Now the Green Blade Rises (1928)

VU 186 – Now the Green Blade Rises (1928)
Author John Macleod Campbell Crum wrote this text for The Oxford Book of Carols (1928) specifically to create an Easter carol for this tune. Crum was a Church of England clergyman who served from 1929 to 1943 as canon of Canterbury. The text uses the metaphor of plant rebirth to illustrate resurrection rebirth in Jesus and, as Carl Daw points out, as “the essential model for the Christian life; our perpetual need to die to self in order to live for God. This is part of the reason why the final stanza takes the form of an affirmation that we can be brought back to life when our hearts have become cold when we are in grief or pain.”
The tune, NOËL NOUVELET, is a fifteenth century French carol tune in the Dorian mode, and comes to us via the Oxford Book of Carols.

 

MV 145 – Draw the Circle Wide (1994)

We continue to use this hymn with our children as they leave for church school. Author and composer Gordon Light, retired bishop of the Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior (of British Columbia), is a well-known Canadian musician who composes, plays guitar and sings as a member of the Common Cup Company. Their musical ministry began when Light and the late Ian Macdonald (a United Church Minister), along with founding members Jim Uhrich, and Bob Wallace (also United Church Ministers) served at neighbouring churches in the early ’80’s. In the following decades the group wrote, performed, and recorded together despite living in different corners the country. Scott McDonald & Richard Betts joined the original quartet on bass & drums in the late ’90’s.
This arrangement is by Michael Bloss, Director of Music Ministries at Christ’s Church Cathedral, Hamilton.

 

VU 179 – Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Give Thanks (1971)

Author and Composer Donald Fishel, a native of Hart, Michigan, wrote this hymn while studying at the University of Michigan School of Music. It was written for the Word of God Community in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The text is a composite of several of Paul’s themes as well as the Easter theme of resurrection. Fishel’s compositions appear in a number of denominational hymn books in North America. Fishel works in music publishing and has been principal flutist in a number of community orchestras, bands and musical theatre productions.

 

MV 175 – May We But Wait (2004)

Our prayer response is by Will Petricko, who has a Master of Divinity degree from the University of Winnipeg and who serves his community as a spiritual care provider.

 

VU 697 – O For a World (1987)

This text by Miriam Therese Winter is an escatological vision of Christ’s kindom of justice and peace. It was originally written for the Presbyterian Women’s Triennial Conference at Purdue University in 1982, whose theme was “Nevertheless . . . the Promise.” The version here reflects revisions made by the author in 1987 when recorded by the Medical Mission Sisters. Carl Daw
remarks that the text is in essence a hymnic palimpsest (a manuscript or piece of writing material on which the original writing has been effaced to make room for later writing but of which traces remain) written on top of Charles Wesley’s “O For a Thousand Tongues to Sing”. Winter is Professor of Liturgy, Worship, Spirituality, and Feminist Studies at Hartford Seminary. A Medical Mission Sister, she has been writing and publishing songs and hymns since Vatican II in the 1960’s. Her early recordings with The Medical Mission Sisters were widely popular, bringing a fresh, dynamic musical context to bible stories and simple songs of faith. Many of her later texts bring feminist theological perspectives to our hymnody, in beautiful poetry and melody. “Mother and God” (VU 280) and “Wellspring of Wisdom” (VU287) are two of her hymns in Voices United which we have frequently used at TSP. In 2013 she was named a Companion of The Centre for Christian Studies, the United Church diaconal theological training school.
The tune, AZMON, is German in origin, and was collected by American Lowell Mason in 1837. It is often associated with Charles Wesley’s “O For a Thousand Tongues to Sing.”

On the Ground in Palestine, April 8, 2018

On the Ground in Palestine, April 8, 2018

 According to Sabeel, Jerusalem: on Good Friday, seventeen Palestinians were killed and more than a thousand Palestinians were wounded by Israeli fire as thousands of protesters marched to Gaza’s border with Israel. The protest on Friday, named the ‘Great March of Return’, was planned by several Palestinian civil society organizations and backed by all political factions to mark forty two years since the first commemoration of Land Day in Palestine.

It is now official that the United States of America has ceased to fund the Palestinian Authority (PA). This decision will not affect the budget which the United States provides for the Palestinian Authority’s security and intelligence forces, which is distinct from the funding which goes towards dealing with civilian issues within the PA.

Israeli Border Police briefly detained a three-year-old Palestinian boy in Hebron for allegedly throwing stones. A video posted online shows the father asking for his child to be returned to him.

PALM SUNDAY PROCESSION ATTACKED: Members of a procession marking Palm Sunday in occupied East Jerusalem were able to wave European flags. But when Palestinian flags came into view, Israeli soldiers attacked. On a weekly basis, peaceful Palestinian demonstrators who dare to raise their own flag are attacked by the occupation forces. (from Sabeel, Jerusalem)

The Washington Post re: Good Friday protests: Israeli authorities claimed they opened fire in response to some protesters who had encroached near the fence, burning tires and hurling stones or molotov cocktails. Footage that emerged from the chaotic scene suggested Israeli soldiers targeted unarmed protesters, including some who were running away and were shot from a distance by snipers.   The aftermath of the protests underscored both the desperate futility of the Palestinian struggle and the relative impunity with which Israel can snuff out Palestinian lives.”

Second Sunday of Easter – Paul’s Hymn Blog

Second Sunday of Easter – Paul’s Hymn Blog

Sunday, April 8 2018

Second Sunday of Easter

Acts 4:32-35, Ps 133, 1 John 1:1-2:2, John 20:19-31

by Paul Stott

 

VU 168 – The Risen Christ (1993)

This text was written by United Church minister Nigel Weaver during the meeting of the Hymn Society in Toronto in 1993. The text looks beyond the events of Easter morning to reflect on a number of Jesus’ resurrection appearances, and their effect on his followers, both then and now. The hymn was first published in Voices United (1996).

The setting, WOODLANDS, by Walter Greatorex, was first published in the Public School Hymnbook (London, 1919) and is named for one of the houses at Gresham School, where he was director of music. The composer, Benjamin Britten, was one of Greatorex’s students.

MV 145 – Draw the Circle Wide (1994)

Author and composer Gordon Light, retired bishop of the Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior (of British Columbia), is a well-known Canadian musician who composes, plays guitar and sings as a member of the Common Cup Company. Their musical ministry began when Light and the late Ian Macdonald (a United Church Minister), along with founding members Jim Uhrich, and Bob Wallace (also United Church Ministers) served at neighbouring churches in the early ’80’s. In the following decades the group wrote, performed, and recorded together despite living in different corners the country. Scott McDonald & Richard Betts joined the original quartet on bass & drums in the late ’90’s.

This arrangement is by Michael Bloss, Director of Music Ministries at Christ’s Church Cathedral, Hamilton.

Cross and Circle (2015)

This communion text is by our own Bill Kervin. The sparse nature of the poetry encourages our imaginations to expand the simple but profound images into a personal, intimate theological picture of the meaning of the sacrament. The repeated refrain reminds us of the closeness of God’s grace that we may find “here.”

The tune, CAIRDE, is by Lim Swee Hong, colleague of Bill at Emmanuel College. A native of Singapore, Swee Hong studied in Manila, in Dallas at SMU, and received his Ph.D. at Drew University in New Jersey. He held academic appointments in Singapore and at Baylor University in Texas before coming to Emmanuel College as Assistant Professor of Sacred Music and Director of the Master of Sacred Music program. He is a prolific composer of hymnody.

VU 482 – Shout for Joy! (1989)

This joyous song, written to follow communion, is from Love From Below (Glasgow, 1989), the third volume of Wild Goose Songs from the Iona Community.  The first three stanzas celebrate the gifts we have received in the communion meal: spiritual food, peace, new worth, faith, wonder, and communion with the saints in heaven.  The final stanza is a trinitarian doxology and affirmation of the present and coming kindom.

The lively setting, LANSDOWNE, is by John L. Bell, who since 1988 has been involved in the work of the Wild Goose Resource Group, the semiautonomous liturgical and musical project of the Iona Community. (The wild goose was a Celtic image for the Holy Spirit.)

Easter Sunday – Paul’s Hymn Blog

Easter Sunday – Paul’s Hymn Blog

Sunday, April 1 2018

Easter Sunday

Isa 25:6-9, Ps 118:1-2,14-14, John 20:1-18

by Paul Stott

 

VU 158-Christ Is Alive! (1968)

Brian Wren wrote this text while serving at Hockley Congregational Church in Essex, England. It was written for the Easter service in 1968, ten days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The text reflects the struggle to express Easter joy and hope in the face of the world’s need for healing and justice for all. The text has been revised over the years to reflect more inclusive language and changing theological perspective. Wren, born in England and ordained in the Congregational Church, now lives in the United States with partner Rev. Susan Heafield, a United Methodist Pastor and composer. As well as being the author of many widely used hymn texts, Wren has written several books related to hymnology, including What Language Shall I Borrow (1989), which explores the range of imagery that can be brought to hymnody.

The tune, TRURO, has been attributed at various times to George Frederick Handel and Charles Burney, but there is no reliable evidence for either of these attributions. It may have been composed by the editor of Musica Sacra, being a Choice Collection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes, and Chants (Bath, c. 1778) in which it first appeared. TRURO is the cathedral city of Cornwall, in southwest England.

MV 145-Draw the Circle Wide (1994)

Author and composer Gordon Light, retired bishop of the Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior (of British Columbia), is a well-known Canadian musician who composes, plays guitar and sings as a member of the Common Cup Company. Their musical ministry began when Light and the late Ian Macdonald, (a United Church Minister) along with founding members Jim Uhrich, and Bob Wallace (also United Church Ministers) served at neighbouring churches in the early ’80’s. In the following decades the group wrote, performed, and recorded together despite living in different corners the country. Scott McDonald & Richard Betts joined the original quartet on bass & drums in the late ’90’s.

VU 155-Jesus Christ Is Risen Today (1708)

This hymn has a long and varied derivation. The first three stanzas are from three anonymous Latin verses from the fourteenth century, beginning Surrexit Christus Hodie, probably written as a trope on the Benedicamus Domino, sung at the end of prayer offices and masses. A number of German translations were made of the Latin trope, which then influenced the English translation which first appeared anonymously in Lyra Davidica (London, 1708). The fourth stanza is a doxology by Charles Wesley, from his Hymns and Sacred Poems (London, 1740).
The tune, EASTER HYMN, first appeared in Lyra Davidica. It is an extraordinary tune for its time, a precursor of the more exuberant tunes of the Evangelical revival later in the century.

VU 177-This Joyful Eastertide (1894)

This familiar Easter carol was written to go with the tune VRUECHTEN by George R. Woodward, a Cambridge scholar and Anglican priest, who collaborated on the editing and publishing of several books of carols and hymns. The text was first published in Carols for

Easter and Ascension (1894). The refrain relies on 1 Corinthians 15:14, “and if Christ has not been raised, then our proclamation has been in vain and your faith has been in vain.” (NRS) VREUCHTEN is a 17th century Dutch song, which was revised into a sacred setting for J. Oudaen’s volume of David’s Psalmen (Amsterdam, 1695).