On the Ground in Palestine, Feb. 3, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Feb. 3, 2017

 According to Sabeel, Jerusalem, Feb. 1, 2018,

A new book by Ronen Bergman, the intelligence correspondent for the Israeli Yediot Aharonot newspaper, chronicles Israel’s ‘2,700’ assassination operations. In his book, Mr Bergman raises moral and legal concerns provoked by state-sponsored killings.

Israel Radio reported that Israel has prevented the Palestinian Authority (PA) efforts to obtain observer status at the UN Conference on Disarmament (UNOG). The Israeli Foreign Ministry has apparently been working behind the scenes with the United States, to prevent the PA’s accession to the international body this year.

Israel launches an unprecedented criminal probe against a Shin Bet interrogator. This is the first investigation to be opened since the establishment of a unit dedicated to complaints against Israel’s internal security service 10 years ago. 

Confidential documents obtained by Yedioth Ahronoth, the largest newspaper in Israel by sales and circulation,  reveal how Israel’s internal security service operated in the Israeli Arab school sector for years. The classified documents reveal how Israel’s internal security service meddled in Arab society’s educational system, firing teachers deemed ‘threats’ and employing Shin Bet agents in the Education Ministry.

In the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Beit Safafa, Israeli settlers raided and spray-painted graffiti in Hebrew saying “Death to the Arabs” before setting a vehicle on fire. Many rights-groups have accused Israel of fostering a “culture of impunity” for Israelis committing violent acts against Palestinians.

During the World Economic Forum in Davos, U.S. President Donald Trump, speaking alongside Israeli  Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, dramatically changed the rules of the decades-long Israeli Palestinian peace process, saying that “we took Jerusalem off the table.”

 From the Middle East Working Group

On the Ground in Palestine, Jan. 14, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Jan. 14, 2017

All of the following news items come courtesy of Sabeel, Jerusalem

On Dec. 28, Israeli naval forces opened fire on Palestinian fishing boats off the coast of Beit Lahiya in the northern Gaza Strip. The Israeli naval forces detained two fishermen, Sameh al-Quqa and Shawqi Bakr, and confiscated their boats.

On Dec. 31, about 1,500 members of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud ruling party voted  unanimously to impose Israeli sovereignty over the occupied West Bank. The non-binding resolution also called for the unlimited construction of settlements in the occupied West Bank.

A new report, by the Israeli human rights organization, B’Tselem, revealed how Israel exploits the West Bank to treat waste –  including hazardous waste – generated in Israel. In so doing, Israel abuses its power as an occupying power. It exposes the Palestinian residents – who are excluded from the decision-making process –  to environmental and health hazards..

Late last month, 63 Israeli teenagers published an open letter to Prime Minister Netanyahu, declaring their refusal to join the Israeli army due to their opposition to the occupation.

 A Palestinian teen, Musaab Firas al-Tamimi, was shot and killed by Israeli forces on Jan. 3 near the Deir Nitham village, northwest of Ramallah city.
On the Ground in Palestine, Dec. 24, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Dec. 24, 2017

On Dec. 18, in the middle of the night, the Israeli army came to the Tamimi family home and arrested 16-year-old Ahed Tamimi, Al Jazeera reports. They confiscated the family’s laptops, phones, and computers. Ahed’s mother Nariman was arrested when she went to visit her.

From Codepink: “Ahed is a high school student preparing for college. She lives in a Palestinian village famous for women’s leadership in resistance to the occupation. As a young girl, Ahed rose to headlines for her bravery to confront the Israeli soldiers who enter her village on a regular basis. In 2014, at the age of 13, she received the Hanzala Courage Award in Turkey. In 2015, she and her family were profiled by the New York Times Magazine.”

According to Sabeel, Jerusalem, Dec. 21, 2017

Mohammed Tamimi, a 14-year-old Palestinian boy, has been placed in a medically-induced coma after Israeli soldiers shot him in the face with a rubber bullet during a protest against a U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Mohamed al-Taweel, a 14-year-old Palestinian boy, affected by Down Syndrome, was arrested while protesting against the U.S.  decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Turkey-based International Down Syndrome Federation denounced the arrest by Israeli soldiers.

The U.S. vetoed a UN resolution seeking to reaffirm Jerusalem’s status as unresolved, after 14 UN Security Council members voted in favor of the resolution, in response to U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize it as Israel’s capital.

On the Ground in Palestine, Dec. 10, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Dec. 10, 2017

Late last month, Israeli police arrested 17 Palestinians, accusing them of carrying out a population census in occupied East Jerusalem. The Israeli police claim this to be illegal work. The arrests are part of a campaign to limit the PA’s activities in East Jerusalem which Israel occupied in 1967 and proceeded to annex it in breach of international law.

Qusra, a village in the Nablus district of the occupied West Bank is outraged after Mahmoud Odeh, a Palestinian farmer, was killed by an Israeli settler while working on his own land on Nov. 29.

Israeli occupation forces have installed six caravans at a military outpost in Hebron city, expropriating  one and a half dunams of Palestinian land.

According to Haaretz, the Israeli High Court of Justice has denied a petition filed in 2013 by Palestinians who wanted land in the Jordan Valley that belonged to them but is being cultivated by settlers to be returned.

 

 

On the Ground in Palestine, Nov. 20, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Nov. 20, 2017

On Nov. 3 at around 7 a.m., Civil Administration officials, together with security forces and four bulldozers arrived at the Badu al-Baba community near ‘Eizariyah, northeast of Jerusalem.  The forces destroyed three pre-fab homes that housed four families, leaving 27 people, including 18 children and youths, homeless. The forces also demolished two bathroom stalls donated by a humanitarian aid organization. The most recent abuse the community was subjected to by the authorities was on Sept. 11 when forces confiscated equipment used to repair the community’s access road.

 

On July 22, three residents of Khirbet Ibziq in the northern Jordan Valley were grazing their flocks on nearby pastureland when a dud – unexploded munitions – went off, killing ‘Udai Nawaj’ah, 16. At least two other Palestinians have been killed in the Jordan Valley in similar circumstances since 2014. The military trains close to Palestinian communities as part of a policy aimed at taking over the area, and does not make sure to remove unexploded ammunition. This illegal practice violates the residents’ rights and endangers their lives.

 

According to Sabeel, Jerusalem: 
A new report by Israeli rights groups B’Tselem and HaMoked  accuses Israel of “systematic abuse” of young Palestinians arrested after attending protests in occupied East Jerusalem, ignoring laws to protect teenagers’ rights, detaining them in the middle of the night and questioning without a lawyer present.

Due to American intervention, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is delaying bringing the “Greater Jerusalem Bill” for a vote during his cabinet meeting. The bill would annex a number of the illegal Israeli Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank to the city of Jerusalem in order to make the Jewish population greater than the Arab population, strengthening the Jewish hold on the city.

 

A group of British activists, organized by our friends in Amos Trust, walked for 174 days from the U.K. to Jerusalem as a symbolic act of penance to apologize for the injustice of the “Balfour Declaration” which marks its 100th anniversary this November. The activists concluded their visit with a worship service at St. George’s cathedral in Jerusalem.

 

Seven Palestinians were killed, and 12 others were wounded after Israeli forces blew up an underground tunnel between the southern Gaza Strip and Israel at the end of last month.

 

The Times of Israel reported Nov. 8 that Jerusalem authorities granted building permits for 240 homes in East Jerusalem.

From the Middle East Working Group

 

 

On the Ground in Palestine, Oct. 22, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Oct. 22, 2017

The olive harvest has started in Palestine. Many Palestinian communities, who earn their living from this harvest, are unable to reach their olive groves due to the separation wall, or their proximity to illegal settlements, or because of military intervention.

 Rev. Naim Ateek, a co-founder of Sabeel, has published his third book “A Palestinian Theology of Liberation: The Bible, Justice, and the Palestine-Israel Conflict.”

Earlier this month, Israeli forces demolished the Bedouin village of al-Araqib for the 119th time. The temporary aluminum shelters, which had been put up since the last time the village was demolished, were bulldozed, and the residents of the town have been ordered to pay for the cumulative cost of demolitions. Members of the village committee say that residents will continue to rebuild their homes and remain in the village.

On Monday, Oct. 2, three Palestinians, including an 11-year-old boy, were injured when Israeli forces raided Shufat refugee camp in occupied East Jerusalem.

On Oct. 11 and 12, three Palestinians were injured in clashes that erupted with Israeli occupation forces after settlers raided Jospeh’s Tomb in Nablus city.

Last Sunday, Israeli settlers stole picked olives from dozens of trees belonging to Palestinian farmers from the occupied West Bank districts of Ramallah and Nablus. Israelis rarely face consequences for such attacks committed against Palestinians.

Hamas and Fatah have signed a landmark reconciliation deal in Cairo in a key step towards ending a ten-year-long rift. The deal will see administrative control of the Gaza Strip handed to a Fatah-backed unity government.

All info from Sabeel, Jerusalem

On the Ground in Palestine, Oct. 4, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Oct. 4, 2017

Since the beginning of September, Israeli forces demolished parts of the three different Palestinian Muslim cemeteries in Jerusalem. Israel claims that the demolitions are necessary to make way for building a national park in the area or to expand two existing streets. The Palestinians of Jerusalem are outraged as photos emerge of open graves exposing the remains of their dead.

Since 2009, over 50 Christian and Muslim holy sites have been vandalized in Israel and the West Bank, but only nine indictments have been filed and only seven convictions handed down. Moreover, only eight of the 53 cases are still under investigation, with the other 45 all closed. The Palestinian community accuses Israel of failing to protect the churches and mosques from extremist Jews.

Israel’s Civil Administration is expected to advance plans soon for 2,000 new homes in West Bank settlements.

According to the World Council of Churches press release, the churches urged the 36th Session of UN Human Rights Council for action regarding the continued construction of the wall in the Cremisan Valley, dispossessing dozens of Palestinian Christian families in Cremisan for the benefit of illegal settlements.

According to Sabeel, Jerusalem: The Israeli government has called on the Israeli Supreme Court to approve plans to demolish the entire village of Khan Al Ahmar, a Palestinian Bedouin community, and forcibly transfer its residents. The village consists of more than 40 Palestinian families.

For the sixth consecutive day on Sunday,  Oct. 1, the Israeli army is imposing a general closure on a cluster of Palestinian villages in the central occupied West Bank. Human rights groups denounce the closure as an act of “collective punishment” on tens of thousands of innocent Palestinians. The closure comes after the shooting attack that left three Israeli security forces dead alongside the Palestinian assailant.

The Walled-Off Hotel was opened by the artist Banksy earlier this year in Bethlehem. The hotel stands just across from the Israeli separation wall in the Palestinian city of Bethlehem. In a ceremony in London, the hotel was granted the award of the leading culture destination as the best Art Hotel in the World.

On Monday, Oct. 2, the municipality of the illegally united Jerusalem distributed demolition notices for several Palestinian homes in the occupied East Jerusalem neighbourhood of Issawiya.  Since 1967, the government of Israel has directly engaged in the construction of 55,000 units for Israelis in Occupied East Jerusalem; in contrast with fewer than 600 units, in the same period of time, for Palestinians in East Jerusalem, the last of which were built 40 years ago.

There is fresh hope that the division within the Palestinian people that has lasted for a whole decade will come to an end. The unity government, including Fatah and Hamas, met on Oct. 3 in Gaza.

On the Ground in Palestine, Sept. 17, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine, Sept. 17, 2017

This information comes from Sabeel, Jerusalem, from their weekly prayer service.

At the beginning of this school year, over two thousand classrooms are lacking for Palestinian students in Israeli-occupied east Jerusalem. The Jerusalem municipality and state authorities have failed to provide the lacking classrooms as ordered by an Israeli High Court ruling five years ago. The Jerusalem municipality allocates most of its funds to its Jewish residents and deprives the Palestinian community of its basic needs.

On Wednesday, Sept. 6, the Supreme Court held a hearing regarding the secret procedures governing the work of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission, despite the opposition of the Israeli state. The Supreme Court decision came following an appeal representing 108 petitioners. The petitioners demanded the establishment of legislation to regulate operations of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission, its roles, authority, form of organization and management, and to require monitoring of its activities and facilities.

On Monday, Sept. 4, Palestinian security forces detained Issa Amro, a prominent human rights activist. Issa’s arrest came a day after he posted comments on his Facebook criticizing Palestinian forces for arresting a journalist. Issa was released from prison on Sunday, Sept. 10.

“The demolition of educational facilities before the start of the school year epitomizes the administrative cruelty and systematic harassment by the authorities designed to drive Palestinians from their land.”

Activists and residents of the village of Jubbet al-Dhib in the southern occupied West Bank district of Bethlehem rebuilt their school in one night. The school was destroyed by Israeli forces two weeks ago.
Israeli police evicted a Palestinian family from their East Jerusalem home. The Shamasnehs vacated the house, where they had lived for 53 years, after Israeli courts ruled in favor of the alleged heir of its original Jewish owners pre 1948. The case was brought by the Israel Land Fund, a right-wing non-governmental organization that advocates, for ideological reasons, the takeover of Palestinian land.

According to Haaretz, Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman told journalists in late August that plans for the implementation of a measure virtually unheard of since 1967 were months away from completion. These are plans for the eviction: Eviction and demolition of two whole West Bank Palestinian villages. Together, the two villages, Susiya, in the South Hebron Hills, and Khan al-Ahmar, east of Jerusalem, are home to hundreds of people, about half of them minors.  Demolishing these communities would constitute the forcible transfer of protected persons, a war crime under the Fourth Geneva Convention.

The following is one of a number of items in the B’Tselem newsletter. 

On Aug. 22, Israeli authorities demolished the school at the community of Jub a-Dib, southeast of Bethlehem, leaving 80 pupils without an educational facility. In Abu a-Nuwar, on Aug. 9, the Civil Administration confiscated solar panels donated by the international community, that provided electricity to the school and kindergarten. On Aug. 21, Civil Administration personnel accompanied by around fifty soldiers, police and border police officers arrived at the Badu al-Baba community which is located near al-‘Eizariyah, northeast of Jerusalem. They dismantled and confiscated a pre-fab that had been placed there around three weeks prior, to serve as a kindergarten for 25 local children aged 4-6, who do not have an alternative educational facility.

The demolition of educational facilities before the start of the school year epitomizes the administrative cruelty and systematic harassment by the authorities designed to drive Palestinians from their land.
10th Anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada needs a legislative framework to fulfill the promise of this vital human rights instrument – UBCIC

10th Anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada needs a legislative framework to fulfill the promise of this vital human rights instrument – UBCIC

Posted by Ubcic on September 13, 2017

 

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provides a crucial framework to achieve reconciliation. Such a human rights-­‐based approach is essential to address the racism and discrimination that has caused such profound harm to Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world.  Violations include uprooting Indigenous peoples from their territories and resources, failure to honour Treaties, tearing Indigenous children from their families, and making Indigenous women, girls and two-­‐ spirited people the targets of unimaginable violence.

 

The adoption of the UN Declaration ten years ago today – on September 13, 2007 – was a crucial victory in the evolution of international human rights law. This historic achievement was possible because Indigenous peoples persisted for more than two decades in advancing a strong and powerful vision of self-­‐determination, decolonization and non-­‐discrimination.

 

The adoption of the Declaration was also made possible because, by the end of this process, influential states including Canada had finally come to accept the necessity and urgency of a new relationship with Indigenous peoples.

 

The UN General Assembly has unanimously reaffirmed the Declaration on three separate occasions, calling for full implementation at national and international levels.

 

Fulfilling this commitment requires meaningful and lasting changes to eliminate discriminatory laws, policies and practices and to ensure Indigenous peoples make their own decisions about their lives and futures.

 

Yet, a decade after the adoption of the Declaration, Canada still lacks concrete and effective mechanisms to uphold its provisions. This is despite many positive statements from the current government committing to fully implement the Declaration.

 

Last month, the United Nations’ top anti-­‐racism body, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, strongly supported Indigenous peoples in urging Canada to adopt a legislative framework and national action plan to implement the UN Declaration.

 

A private members bill expected to come before the House of Commons this fall for second reading – Bill C-­‐262 introduced by MP Romeo Saganash – contains elements of such a framework. This includes: repudiation of colonialism and doctrines of superiority; affirmation that the standards set out in the UN Declaration have application in Canadian law; and review and reform of federal legislation to ensure consistency with the minimum standards set out in the UN Declaration. In addition, the Bill requires that a national action plan be developed in partnership with Indigenous peoples.

 

By approaching implementation of the Declaration through a legislative framework, there is greater assurance that crucial progress made will not be undone by a future government. Our organizations and Nations call on the federal government to embrace and build on the key elements of implementation already set out in Bill C-­‐262.

 

We appreciate that full implementation of the Declaration requires long-­‐term commitment and collaboration. As the Truth and Reconciliation Commission repeatedly reminded us, “reconciliation is going to take hard work.”

 

This is the time to act. Public responses to the TRC’s Calls to Action demonstrate a profound desire among Canadians to build a just relationship between Indigenous peoples and non-­‐Indigenous Canadians. As the TRC itself stated, the Declaration provides the framework for doing so. However, putting this framework into place requires more than fine words. It requires concrete, effective action.

 

The Coalition for the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples

 

Statement endorsed by:

 

Amnesty International Canada; Amnistie internationale Canada francophone; Assembly of First Nations; Assemblée des Premières Nations Québec-­‐Labrador and Assembly of First Nations Quebec-­‐Labrador; British Columbia Assembly of First Nations; Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers); Confederacy of Treaty 6; First Nations Summit; Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee); Indigenous Bar Association; Indigenous World Association; KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives; Métis Nation; MiningWatch Canada; Native Women’s Association of Canada; Nunavut Tunngavik; Oxfam Canada; Oxfam-­‐Québec; Quebec Native Women/Femmes Autochtones du Québec; Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs

 

Source: 10th Anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Canada needs a legislative framework to fulfill the promise of this vital human rights instrument – UBCIC

On the Ground in Palestine – Sept. 1, 2017

On the Ground in Palestine – Sept. 1, 2017

Haaretz reports, “The start of the school year in a West Bank village was pushed back to Sunday (Aug. 27) after the Israeli Civil Administration on Tuesday confiscated and destroyed trailers that were supposed to serve as classrooms, along with other educational equipment. Authorities have confiscated and destroyed trailers used as classrooms in three other Palestinian communities in the last two weeks.”

According to the Jerusalem Post, “The Palestinian leadership in Ramallah is considering dismantling the Palestinian Authority (PA), if there is no political horizon to establish an independent Palestinian state, [said] Ahmad Majdalani, a confidant of PA President Mahmoud Abbas.

Last month, Israel revoked the citizenship of hundreds of Israeli Arab Bedouins and left them stateless. Over  500 citizens lost their citizen-status with a single keystroke and with no further explanation.        

Last week, Israeli authorities stormed the Silwan neighborhood of occupied East Jerusalem and demolished a Palestinian home for the second time. The same home, 60 square metres, had just been demolished on Aug. 15 by the Israeli army.

With the help of fellow Jerusalemites, the family rebuilt a temporary home made of tin sheets, which Israeli forces came to destroy on Aug. 22. The family and their friends are already working to rebuild the house for the third time.

A brand-new Palestinian primary school in Jubbet Al-Dhib was razed by Israel just as the new school year was set to begin. The six newly installed steel terrapin cabins were erected in the village of Jubbet Al Dhib so that local children do not have to walk for an hour to get to school. A total of 55 West Bank schools are currently threatened with demolition and “stop-work” orders.

From the Middle East Working Group