Update on Positive Returns From Divesting and Reinvesting

Update on Positive Returns From Divesting and Reinvesting

Walter Whiteley, member of the TSP Climate Justice Group and former TSP Trustee.

 

Over 3 years ago, TSP voted to divest from Fossil Fuels – based on our social commitments – with the anticipation that we could still obtain good financial returns and better social returns.  In the process of reinvesting, TSP Trustees chose Genus Capital Management Fossil Free Funds, including some impact funds, for most of the endowment.   We have seen good returns from these investments – and a recent report found that, overall reduced carbon intensive portfolios had lower returns than low carbon portfolios, over the seven years 2010-2017, low carbon intensity improved returns by 9.2% cumulatively.

 

Genus Capital released their inaugural Carbon Emissions Report this week, , which makes some key findings, relevant to our choices collectively, and individually.

 

From the Genus report:

“A company’s COemissions, or carbon emissions, is a particularly significant measure for those investors who are concerned about climate change and the environmental impact of their investments. Genus’ inaugural carbon report examines the relationship between carbon emissions, carbon intensity and investment returns. The research team at Genus applied factor analysis to isolate the impact of carbon intensity on a portfolio of global investments (35% S&P/TSX Composite/ 65% MSCI World) between 2010 and 2017.

 

The research indicated that carbon intensity had a 9.2 per cent cumulative drag on portfolio performance during the seven-year period ending March 31, 2017. Carbon intensity refers to the volume of a company’s carbon dioxide emissions for every million dollars in revenue (USD). ”

 

Moreover, the report concluded that Canadian companies tend to be among the worst offenders when evaluated based on carbon intensity when compared to other developed world equity markets, owing to the Energy sector’s significant weighting in the Canadian market. “

 

Put positively, fossil fuel divestment refocuses choices on better performing assets and companies. Also Global markets offer a better range of low intensity stocks and bonds than the Canadian markets.

 

This Genus research builds on last year’s Fossil Fuel Divestment Report, which compared their own three year returns with the Canadian market.  Together, these underscore that investors needn’t sacrifice investment returns to own a portfolio that’s aligned with their values and helps build a low carbon future.

 

These are exciting and active times for divestment, positive re-investment and new opportunities to learn and act.  Here are a few more links:

Outstanding Lysistrata Cast to Grace the Boards at TSP

The creative team behind Lysistrata and the Temple of Gaia – the new play by David S. Craig – are pleased to present the actors who will be bringing this production to an audience for the first time ever on Earth Sunday, April 24th, 2:00 p.m. at Trinity St. Paul’s. Tickets are on sale now via Eventbrite or at the door. This promises to be an inspiring and uplifting way to mark Earth Sunday – all ages are welcome!


Sophia Walker (Lysistrata)Walker

Sophia has extensive theatre credits including Blood Wedding, Jitters, The Heidi Chronicles at the Soulpepper Theatre Company. Mary’s Wedding (The Blyth Festival), Intimate Apparel (The Grand Theatre) and nine seasons at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. She played Salima in the Dora-winning production of Ruined (Obsidian/Nightwood) and Menelaus and Kerthia in the Dora-winning The Penelopiad (Nightwood Theatre). She also has extensive film and television credits and has won Mary Savidge, Michael Mawson and Jean A. Chalmers and Dora Awards.

John Cleland (Cleon)Cleland

John has been a working actor since 1995.  He has worked at theatres around Canada but has been fortunate to be able to work primarily in Toronto since the birth of his children 12 years ago.  He has worked with David (and Roseneath Theatre) on two pieces prior to Lysistrata – Wrecked  and Tough Case.  John is excited to embark on this new ride with such an accomplished group.

For more about John please check out his website at johnnycleland.com.

Anand Rajaram (Pietr)Rajaram

Anand has worked extensively with VideoCabaret, CORPUS, Second City, Stratford Festival, CanStage and others. He created Hys Unauthoryzed Lyfe & Tymes, Communist ‘Til Payday, Cowboys & Indians, and Stories From The Mountaintop. Recently, he was in Mustard at the Tarragon Theatre. Upcoming, at Soulpepper, he’ll be part of the Asian Bamboo Cabaret and in The 39 Steps. He is a regular panelist on CBC Radio’s Because News.

Paolo Santalucia (Theo)Santalucia

A graduate of the University of Toronto and Sheridan College’s Theatre and Drama Studies Program Paolo Santalucia is a Dora award-winning Toronto-based theatre artist. Paolo has worked in multiple productions for Soulpepper Theatre, the Tarragon Theatre Theatre Passe Muraille,  Driftwood Theatre, YPT  and The Howland Company. Paolo is the recipient of two Dora awards for his work in the Ensemble of Of Human Bondage and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, and is also the recipient of a MyTorotontoTheatre Award for his work in Hamlet.

Cliff Saunders  (“G” & Gaia’s Familiar)Saunders

Cliff has appeared in The Heir Apparent (Chicago Shakespeare). Les Miserables (Broadway/ Toronto), The 39 Steps (Broadway/Boston), and David S. Craig’s Danny King of the Basement (Roseneath). Cliff has also performed in other roles for the Stratford Festival, Canstage, Mirvish, Tarragon, Soulpepper, Citadel, Aquarius, Grand, YPT, and Blyth among other companies.

Jenny Young (“H” & Gaia)Young

Jenny has extensive theatre experience including Waiting Room (Tarragon);  Christina, The Girl King and  Alice Through the Looking Glass (Stratford Festival); A Moon for the Misbegotten, Age of Arousal (Shaw Festival); Innocence Lost (Centaur, NAC); The Penelopiad (Royal Shakespeare Company, NAC); The Anger in Ernest And Ernestine (Theatre Columbus); and The Shape of a Girl (National Tour).

Mayko Nguyen (Cassandra)Nguyen

Dora Award nominee Mayko has performed in  LULU v.2 (Rhubarb estival), Helen Lawrence (Canadian Stage), Passion Play (OtM/Convergence Theatre/Sheep No Wool), Carried away on the crest of a wave (Tarragon Theatre), Offensive Fouls (Hustle N’ Bustle Theatre). Mayko has also appeared in numerious television and film productions.

 

Natalia Gracious (Pandora)Gracious

A graduate of Sheridan Institute’s Musical Theatre program, Natalia’s past credits include Anjali in Beneath the Banyan Tree (Theatre Direct), Marcy Park in The 25th Annual…Spelling Bee (The Grand Theatre), Pepper in Annie (YPT) and two years as Sister Mary Leo in Nunsense (Harbourfront Theatre). A fan of David S. Craig, Natalia is excited to be here! Natalia can be seen at nofunbiz.com.


David S. Craig (Playwright)Craig

David S. Craig is a Toronto based playwright, actor, and producer. He has written twenty-eight professionally produced plays including Having Hope at Home, The Neverending Story and Danny, King of the Basement which have been produced across Canada, The United States, and Europe.  Mr. Craig has won The Dora Mavor Moore Award for Outstanding Production (three times), the Chalmers New Play Award (three times), the Rideau Award, The Canada Council Prize, The Writer’s Guild Prize for Radio Drama and a Harold. In 2014 he was awarded the Barbara Hamilton Award for Artistic Excellence from the City of Toronto.

Leah Cherniak (Director)Cherniak

Leah Cherniak is the Co-Founder with Martha Ross of Theatre Columbus (now Common Boots Theatre) in Toronto. The company created over 30 new plays and has an excellent reputation for innovative productions of classics. Leah studied theatre at École Jacques Lecoq in Paris after graduating from U of T with a theatre degree from the University College Drama Program. She is an Associate Artist with the Soulpepper Theatre Company in Toronto.

Krista MacIsaac (Stage Manager)Krista

Krista has been worshipping Gaia off and on since high school. She has stage managed North American tours for Roseneath Theatre, concerts and events for Roy Thomson Hall, Massey Hall, TIFF and Tapestry Opera. Other credits include Common Boots, Odyssey Theatre, YPT, Luminato, and Mirvish.

 

Talking Lysistrata with Director Leah Cherniak

Talking Lysistrata with Director Leah Cherniak

Leah Cherniak is the Co-Founder with Martha Ross of Theatre Columbus (now Common Boots Theatre) in Toronto. The company created over 30 new plays and has an excellent reputation for innovative productions of classics. Leah studied theatre at École Jacques Lecoq in Paris after graduating from U of T with a theatre degree from the University College Drama Program. She is an Associate Artist with Soulpepper Theatre Company. We caught up with her in early April as she was starting to get ready for rehearsals.

Q. Are you excited to be bringing this new play to an audience for the first time?

A. I’m always excited to be doing something new with David – even though it is just a single performance. He’s a fantastic talent and I’m really enjoying working with him on putting this reading together.

Q. Is this play a modern classic or a classicly modern one?

A. It is definitely modern and contemporary but I think of it more as a complete reinvention of a classic play. The main characters are there but the situation, dialogue and the struggle are completely reimagined for today’s audiences.

Q. What has intrigued you the most about reading the play so far?

A. I directed another version of this play about 15 years ago so it is really fun to read something you are already familiar with and then see how the playwright has adapted and changed the source material. I also love the fact that the women in this play are the strong characters that move the action and are counteracting the actions of the men’s agenda. It’s also really funny.

Q. Lysistrata is a dramatic reading rather than a full-on play – how does that make your job as Director more difficult?

A. As a Director I can only prepare so much because we have very limited rehearsal time. This makes the project more fun but also more challenging. We will need to really focus on the essential parts to activate the audience’s imagination and bring the world of Lysistrata to life.

Q. I understand that there will be some Greek Chorusing going on – how will you be using that?

A. Lysistrata is not a musical but the Greek chorus will bring some music and song that will help to play up the comedic aspects. The songs have a lovely cabaret style vibe that sets the comedy going from the beginning and sustains it throughout as the they keep coming back with “new and improved” messages for the cast and audience.

Q. How do you feel about the issue at hand – is climate change affecting your life today?

A. Experiencing Lysistrata & the Temple of Gaia is a great reminder to everyone that we need to keep focused on this issue – we need to get on with fixing things and stop talking about it. The play is not prescriptive but still very forceful. Comedy is a great way to get a point across to a broad audience.

Q. What do you think the audience should know about Lysistrata before seeing the show?

A. This is not some kind of fusty old Greek classic. David has done an amazing job of making this play really contemporary and witty. It will be a delightful afternoon.

Lysistrata Tickets On Sale Now!

Lysistrata Tickets On Sale Now!

The TSP Climate Justice Group in cooperation with toronto350.org is pleased to announce that tickets are now on sale for Lysistrata and the Temple of Gaia – the provocative new climate-themed sex comedy from master playwright David S. Craig. Tickets are only $10.00 for Students/Seniors/Underemployed and $20.00 for Adults.

You can buy your tickets online (service charge applies) or through the TSP Climate Justice Group.

Eventbrite - Lysistrata & The Temple of Gaia

Stay tuned for more details on the performance.

Climate Comedy Coming to TSP

Climate Comedy Coming to TSP

Lysistrata and The Temple of Gaia - April 24, 2016 - 2:00 p.m.It becomes clearer every day that the climate crisis is the defining issue of our time and the need to respond to this challenge is urgent if we are to create a future, not just for our children, but ourselves. In the face of something so profound and threatening can we have a laugh at our own behaviour and the world’s expense?

TSP Members at Act on Climate March in Quebec City

The Act on Climate March or Marche Action Climat drew an estimated 25,000+ people to Quebec City Saturday April 11, 2015. Solidarity actions happened in cities and communities across the country. This was the largest public demonstration of concern about climate change in Canadian history. The march was led by Indigenous men, women and children from coast to coast. They are the long-time leaders of this struggle demanding the treaties be honoured and Nations be allowed to protect land, air and water for traditional use and future generations. We marched to send a clear and united message to the premiers meeting in Quebec City on Tuesday: Yes to climate protection, No to pipelines and tar sands expansion, and Yes to developing renewable energy in a just and sustainable way.

This meeting of the premiers was specifically to talk about what their provincial and our collective response to climate change will be. The federal government led by Stephen Harper has demonstrated little interest in this question. They have allowed the March deadline for countries to submit their proposals to mitigate climate change ahead of the UN Climate Summit in Paris to pass unanswered. They say they are waiting to hear what the premiers decide to do. This lack of leadership on the part of the federal government is unpardonable. It demonstrates their cowardice to face up to the mistakes they have made in their destruction of environmental safeguards and aggressive promotion of pipelines and tar sands expansion. Their justification is economic growth. But if you look at the numbers, Stephen Harper has actually had the poorest record of economic growth since the recession of the 1930’s. An economy powered by renewable energy, a reduction in extreme consumption, and an environment and climate that helps keep our population healthy and employed is the vision for the future held up by the leaders and organizers of this historic march.

The leaders who spoke at the march conveyed a clear message (even to those of us who are limited in French). The message was: Il est possible – It is possible. We do not have to go down the dark road we are on. We can change directions and chose a different vision for the future. I was also reminded at this march that the people of Quebec take a pride and protective stance towards their province that I don’t often feel in Ontario. It is their home, it is the place they live and they will protect it from those who would, for example, try and force a pipeline like Energy East through. To me, it echoed how Indigenous leaders talk about protecting and caring for their traditional territories. A sense of place and connectedness grounds these folks. I am inspired to look for and foster that sense of connectedness to the place I call home and continue organizing here in Toronto. We must stop the expansion of the tar sands as Canada’s largest greenhouse gas emitter and destroyer of traditional territories. We must honour the necessity that we transition to a renewable energy economy in a way that is equitable and just for everyone who works and lives here. These are huge political tasks but the momentum is building and il est possible.

-Madeleine Endicott, TSP Climate Justice Group Member